Telecommuting or a nap at work, which would you pick?

Telecommuting has grown increasingly popular over the years as harried Americans have tried to juggle work and family. But oddly enough a new poll suggests that slightly more people would like the option to nap at work than to telecommute.

“The survey of 250 U.S. workers and 250 U.S. managers on productivity has some more surprising findings:

  • 61% of staffers surveyed say they want their company to allow 20-minute “power naps,” yet only 6% of companies offer such a policy.
  • 60% of U.S. workers (and 73% of managers) say telecommuting is a big booster of productivity, although 51% of U.S. companies don’t have a formal telecommuting policy,” reports Thestreet.com of a poll commissioned by a division of Staples, the office supply chain.
Which would you prefer, working from home instead of in an office like this, or being able to nap at work?

Which would you prefer, working from home instead of in an office like this, or being able to nap at work?

I worked from home, telecommuting, for six and a half years and found it the most productive job I’ve had in a long, long time. I now work in an office that has a “Zen room” where presumably I could take a power nap each day but I never will given the open office environment in which I work and in which everyone watches everyone.

Which would you rather be able to do, nap at work, or work from home a day or more a week?

John N. Frank

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This entry was posted in management issues, Uncategorized, working conditions and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Telecommuting or a nap at work, which would you pick?

  1. Glanna says:

    I prefer working from home not only for the occasional naps but also because of the different benefits one can get from it. It’s been more than 4 years now and I can still see the big difference on my savings in terms of gas, food and clothing budget. Aside from that, I get more freedom when working from home. I get to set my own work hours, productivity is increased and absenteeism is reduced. Telecommuting may work for everyone as long as all the employees are equipped with the right tools that are essential for the job.

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