ABJH Excerpt: The Early-Career Crisis

Today, we continue to run excerpts from my new book, Always Be Job Hunting to give you the flavor of the book and encourage you to check it out on Amazon.com

My years at BusinessWeek were truly the best and worst of times. My father died in early 1986, a little more than a year after I started at BW. That, in turn, led to the beginning of the end of my marriage, partly because my father died of a heart attack after one of countless fights with my-then wife who could never stomach my parents and what she called their “blue collar gauche” ways.

Friends advised me to divorce her then but the good Catholic boy in me was determined to somehow hang on to the marriage. My first test of that approach came in 1987 when BusinessWeek wanted to transfer me to another bureau. That was the routine; spend three years in one city then move on. My application included the fact that I’d minored in German so going to BusinessWeek’s Germany bureau was a possible option.

My dad holding me not long after I was born in 1953. He died in 1987 and my career never truly recovered from what came next..

My dad holding me not long after I was born in 1953. He died in 1987 and my career never truly recovered from what came next..

I could have been there when the Wall tumbled and Germany was reunited, an amazing story for anyone who grew up in the Cold War years, as I did.

But my spouse at the time reacted to a transfer with an ultimatum – if I went to another city for BusinessWeek, I went alone. She would not leave a new business she and a partner were starting up in Chicago (a business which six years later when we were going through divorce was valued as worthless, by the way).

Trying to save my marriage, I looked for another way to find a job in Chicago.

Intrigued? Read more by buying the book on Amazon.com in either paperback or Kindle editions.

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