5 Telltale Signs Your Employer Isn’t Treating You Fairly

Although most people enjoy where they work, some folks don’t get a fair deal in the workplace. Their employers can impose harsh working conditions, especially ones that limit their earnings. In some cases, companies seldom reward employees for going the extra mile with customers.

The ugly truth is that it’s not uncommon to find employers taking advantage of their staff. Do you think your employer isn’t treating you fairly? If so, these five telltale signs could confirm that for you:

  1. Your boss always makes you work longer hours

When you started your job, you’ll have been given a contract of employment. In that document, it will state your working hours. If you always work more than those hours, your boss could be taking advantage of you.

  1. You are doing more than one person’s job

When a business downsizes, bosses expect some workers to take up the slack. That usually means doing the equivalent of two or more jobs. As you can imagine, that’s not fair on you. Especially if you’re not given any extra reward for doing so.

  1. Your boss never appreciates you

Are you a person or a robot? In the view of some employers, you could fall into the latter category! Does your boss expect you to work and never gives you positive feedback? If the answer is yes, it’s because they don’t appreciate you.

  1. Your employer doesn’t follow through on their promises

Has your boss promised you a raise? Perhaps some new machinery or colleagues to help you with your work? The sad truth is that some bosses downright lie to staff.

  1. Your employer doesn’t have a state compensation scheme in place

Some states allow companies to opt out of workers’ compensation programs. If your employer has done that, it’s likely any claims you make will go in their favor rather than yours. Here’s how that can affect you:

 


Infographic Created By Katz Friedman

This post has been contributed by Ryan Gatt, it may contain affiliate links.

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