How to Make Mondays a Day You Look Forward To 

Mondays seem to be a universally hated day. In fact, according to a poll conducted by YouGov, over half of Americans (58 percent to be exact) say Monday is their least favorite day of the week. After spending two days relaxing and having fun after a long week of work, people don’t want it to end. Naturally, we dread the new work week and can’t wait until Friday rolls around. 

But what if you stopped living for the weekend and actually started enjoying every day of the week, especially Mondays? With a few simple habits and a positive mindset, Mondays can easily become your favorite day of the week. Here are a few tips to start implementing before the next Monday rolls around. 

1. Plan Monday on Friday 

Pro tip: planning Monday on Friday can help you ease into the week and can help increase your productivity. When you get done with work for the week on Friday, take five to ten minutes to plan out your Monday so you’re prepped and ready to tackle the week ahead. 

2. Wear your best outfit 

It may be yoga leggings and a t-shirt or a full-on pants suit, whatever outfit makes you feel comfortable and confident in, throw it on. Our clothing can help boost our mood and who doesn’t like feeling good? When we look good, we feel good and we perform better, too. 

3. Change your Monday mindset 

If you go to bed every Sunday dreading Monday, you’re probably going to wake up and have a dreadful Monday. Instead of thinking of Monday as the worst day, change your mindset around and make it a day you look forward to. 

Start planning something in your schedule that puts a smile on your face—like getting coffee at your favorite coffee shop, taking your dog for a walk during your lunch break or grabbing dinner with a friend after work. Doing this will help you get out of the “living for the weekend” mindset so you can enjoy every day (even Mondays). 

For more tips on how to make Mondays a day you actually look forward to, check out the infographic below.

 

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